Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero

Due for release in the UK on 10th August, Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero is a 2018 computer-animated adventure film about the real-life Sergeant Stubby, a stray Boston Terrier who becomes a hero during World War I.

Although the film credits state that the characters in the film are fictitious, the film follows the actual actions of the dog and includes real people involved in his story.

 

In the film he is adopted by, or rather adopts, Robert Conroy, a young U.S. Army doughboy in the 26th Yankee Division. Given the name Stubby, the dog makes it aboard the the SS Minnesota with the troops and, by the time they disembark in France, Stubby is the 102nd Infantry’s unofficial mascot.

Col. Parker gave special orders that Stubby remain with the 26th in France throughout the war. It was said the dog “was the only member of his regiment that could talk back to Parker and get away with it.”

The 26th Yankee Division took part in four major offensives — Aisne-Marne, Champagne-Marne, Saint-Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne — and 17 engagements. They saw more fighting than any other American infantry division and Stubby was there for the duration.

 

Much of what is shown on screen actually happened making Sgt. Stubby a bit of an animated history lesson. But don’t let that put you off.

Also, although it’s animated (suggesting aimed at kids) this is not a “Disneyesque”. It shows World War One, including trench warfare, bombings, shootings, gas attacks, etc. The main characters are constantly in danger, one even dies, as do lots of background soldiers. So not your typical family movie.

And while there are other too-good-to-be-true pooches in films, this one is actually real.He participated in 17 battles and trotted out of the conflict as a decorated vet. He lived until 1926, and is preserved in the Smithsonian.

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