Festive Drinks

Eggnog

Eggnog is traditionally made with milk or cream, sugar and whipped eggs, and brandy or rum.

According to Wikipedia, Eggnog may have developed from the medieval drink made with hot milk and wine or ale called posset. Eggs were added to some posset recipes.

The term “eggnog” was first used in 1775, when Maryland clergyman and philologist Jonathan Boucher wrote a poem about the drink. The poem was not published until 30 years after his death. The first printed use of the term was in 1788 in the New-Jersey Journal  which referred to a young man drinking a glass of eggnog.

egg-nog-2999740_1920

Mulled wine

A medieval English cookery book from 1390 mentioned mulled wine. Mulled wine is made by adding mulling spices to red wine. Sometimes raisins or other fruit are added along with sugar. It can be served hot or warm.

Wassail

Wassail is hot traditional punch. It can be mulled cider or made with brandy and sherry or rum. It is traditionally drunk as part of wassailing, or carol singing door to door.

Variations

  • Glühwein – A mulled wine usually prepared from red wine, heated and spiced with cinnamon sticks, cloves, sugar, peel and star aniseed.
  • Glögg – A Christmas tradition in Scandinavian countries, it has cardamom pods added to the mulled wine mix and almonds and raisins are used as a garnish.

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The 12 Days of Christmas (with alcohol) by Jeremy Lion

 

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